Getting-It-Done Leadership


Welcome to our on-going Bloggers Book Study! If you missed the first installment, you can catch up here!

CHAPTER 3 (pages 51-72)
This chapter tells the story of how Willow turned vision into action.

It Takes More Than Another Pep Talk – Some leaders believe that if they just keep talking about the dream, the vision will automatically be accomplished. Getting-it-done leadership is entirely different. People need a step-by-step plan to move from vision to reality.

Refining Vision With a Strategic Plan – In the mid-nineties they decided at Willow to formally draft a strategic plan.

In refining the vision, they highlighted three key areas of emphasis for the next five years: evangelism, spiritual maturity of believers, and outreach (with focus on caring for the poor) .

Setting Goals With Balance In Mind – It is quite interesting that, for the first twenty years of Willow, they never had formalized specific goals. As Hybels worked with his leaders to refine the vision, he decided it was time for specific goals for each of the areas of emphasis. Clear goals would allow them to maintain the balance between all three.

The leadership circles at Willow prayed, wrestled and thought about which specific goals to set. Borrowing from Jim Collins’ book, Built to Last, they looked for goals that would be BHAGs: big, hairy, audacious goals, that humans could not accomplish without God’s supernatural activity.

Finding ChampionsHybels announced the numeric goals publicly. The leaders were anxious and challenged. Hybels realized he had to find “goal champions” – leaders willing to to lead out in achieving each of the goals. This created an atmosphere of renewed excitement and adventure!

In 1996, Hybels presented the refined vision to a very receptive congregation. There was great excitement! They started tracking progress. Many areas were growing, but not all. Though there was an energetic and dynamic environment, Bill Hybels asked himself, what more could they do?

One Thing Missing – He started feeling very uneasy. He persisted in asking questions and looking for answers to the uneasiness, even when it made others uncomfortable.

He discovered that his daughter had college friends that had felt very connected with the Student Impact ministries at Willow, but not with Willow itself. This was a revelation. He says, “Without my being consciously aware of it, Willow had evolved from a close-knit, single-identity, biblically functioning community into a decentralized, multi-identity, loosely connected federation of sub-ministries.”
How to rectify this? The executive leadership team now had the challenge of connecting every staff member directly to the strategic plan.

Church Basics: Alignment – So began the process of aligning the staff with the vision. Willow persisted in the alignment process, carrying out months of meetings to help everybody see that the church could not be a federation of sub-ministries. While many leaders were receptive, Hybels encountered difficulties with some.

It was most definitely a long, bumpy road. Eventually, Hybels felt he had to give the resistant members of staff an ultimatum of sorts. “I’m not asking for your begrudging participation in this alignment,” he told them. “It’s one-hundred-percent time. If you can’t give it, or won’t give it, it’s time for you to go.”

As Bill describes it, this was one of the most taxing leadership challenges they have ever experienced at Willow. But he has no regrets. Leaders from each department now present both their progress and their plans twice a year. Every staff member is a stakeholder in the overall vision.

A Modern Day Tragedy – Why is it that some people and some churches settle for having little or no impact in their communities? The great tragedy is that only a fraction of pastors worldwide are actually exercising their spiritual gift of leadership. The consequences of this neglect are far-reaching. The gift of leadership is the gift that catalyzes all others.

All leaders in the Kingdom should commit to fully developing their leadership potential. Leaders have to decide: will you simply give pep talks and dream, or will you manage for results?

Bill addressed this question at Harvard Business School, when he was challenged as to why a church would want to use best practice – shouldn’t they stick to “spiritual” matters? His answer? If we really believe the church is the hope of the world, then we must lead in such a way that there are results.

Was Jesus LaissezFaire? (In other words, did he just sit back and not interfere?) No, not one bit. He was passionate about building his Father’s kingdom, and he expects church leaders to build prevailing churches. He promised to walk alongside each leader, empowering them. Hybels concludes, “It’s time for church leaders to really lead. It’s time for us to be about our Father’s business with diligence, dependence and get-it-done leadership.”

Chapter 4 at http://mauriciotinoco.com tomorrow

Advertisements

18 thoughts on “Getting-It-Done Leadership

  1. from an ad biz perspective, metrics is one of the important indicators of success so i tend to look at that (occupational hazard). i think there has to be a balance between teaching those we lead how to formulate strategic plans and using metrics as one way to measure the success of those plans."Was Jesus Laissez-Faire?" very thought provoking question. Love this FRC Bloggers Bookstudy!

    Like

  2. "The great tragedy is that only a fraction of pastors worldwide are actually exercising their spiritual gift of leadership."This jumped at me immediately, maybe because I've seen this happen and still hope that it is not to late for pastors to get back on track and exercise the spiritual gift of leadership… And I ask myself.. i know this is directed to pastors.. but what about just us followers of Christ? Hybels says "If we really believe the church is the hope of the world, then we must lead in such a way that there are results."I'm kinda like Leadhership, where metrics and all this strategy stuff doesn't come naturally to me .. but God has been placing leaders that are wired this way to teach me and help me see the results, to work with strategies… for that I am grateful.Thank you Barby.. great, great, great!!!

    Like

  3. Love this idea…GREAT way to learn…together! I loved this chapter, maybe because I AM the "metrics" type so a little confirmation was nice šŸ˜‰ It's true that vision is SO important, but the strategies to achieve it are equally as important. I mean, if I have a picture of Hawaii on my wall and continutously tell everyone I want to go there and dream about it, it won't get me there. I need a map. Or at least the guy flying the plane does. Either way, I need a plan/strategy. Have also had the same feelings as GenieMo before too, though, about the church becoming to "business-like." But ya know, we have to be good stewards of what God has given us. We should do the best we can to increase our productivity and effectiveness…ESPECIALLY if we are the "hope of the world."

    Like

  4. Hey guys, love all the feedback! Hybels is very transparent in all this – and he makes it clear that he took that very strong (and wrenching) stand only after months and months of working with his leaders to help them understand and support the vision.

    Like

  5. Great review Barby.Its so cool to see the story behind Willow. For a lot of us, Willow is one of the big pioneers in the church world. So to see what they had to go through, the things they had to wrestle with and the attitude that Hybels took with those that weren't aligned with the vision. "It's one-hundred-percent time. If you can't give it, or won't give it, it's time for you to go."That reinforces why we need to step up. Why we have to defend the vision when its challenged or questioned.This isn't a game, there are hurting and needing people out there in search of hope and love. Align with the vision or move along.

    Like

  6. The Part that spoke to me the most was "Was Jesus Laissez-Faire? (In other words, did he just sit back and not interfere?)Jesus was passionate about building His Father's Kingdom and we need to follow His lead. P. Troy has such passion for the vision God gave Flamingo and that pours out to us. As he says we need to be intentional about our ethos, about the XL7 skills…and we need to pay attention to the need, the lost…we need to "be intentional" if we are going to change the world together!As Heredes said "more reason to stay connected to the weekend services, the global staff meetings , celebration meetings , book studies like this … so the vision can be in front of us at all times"Thanks Barby!

    Like

  7. I agree with iStacie: "The great tragedy is that only a fraction of pastors worldwide are actually exercising their spiritual gift of leadership." So glad to be working & doing life with a great leader. It's awesome to remember that as we run after the vision for His kingdom, He promised to walk alongside each leader, empowering them.

    Like

  8. Great review! I really enjoyed this chapter… Thoughts: -Love the part about "BHAGs: big, hairy, audacious goals, that humans could not accomplish without God's supernatural activity." Time and time again we see how God uses His church to accomplish His mission in ways we could never imagine. -I also enjoyed Hybles answer: "when he was challenged as to why a church would want to use best practice – shouldn't they stick to "spiritual" matters? His answer? If we really believe the church is the hope of the world, then we must lead in such a way that there are results." Honestly I used to struggle with the idea that the church was becoming too business minded. But as I continue this journey I see the importance to strive for results. Results that will make a "Kingdom difference"Thanks Barby!

    Like

  9. The line that really spoke to me was "The great tragedy is that only a fraction of pastors worldwide are actually exercising their spiritual gift of leadership." Am I being faithful and exercising the gifts God's given me? At the end of my life I would hate to see that I didn't cap out on the "potentialometer". Totally agree with what Heredes said:"This is why I find it important to keep the SAME vision in front of your staff and teams…"I think something we do well at Flamingo is celebrating the victories of other teams and ministries. Celebrating each other helps keep us humble and helps us remain aligned. At beach baptism this past week people from different teams and ministries joined together to make baptism happen. When we're all after the same vision the "whatever it takes" attitude becomes evident. To quote a wise philosopher "we're all in this together" (or it could have been High School Musical, I forget) šŸ™‚

    Like

  10. Great review, Barby!It's the discussion on alignment that spoke the most to me, because we're living in it the middle of it in our college ministry.1) There was a time when this question dominated our planning meetings; we knew what we wanted for our students (get them dialed into the vision of Flamingo), but weren't effective at getting them there. Pastor Troy says that one of the best things leaders can do is evaluate and correct execution, and that's what we did. We dreamed, implemented, then evaluated, and then chucked what didn't work. It's work, but it has to happen if a vision is going to become a reality.2) I agree with Heredes here. If everything you do lines up with the God-given vision, then you never have to apologize or back down from asking for the numbers.

    Like

  11. Barby-Great question #1As a leader I get it and hit the ground running but often see those I'm leading wondering where I am going and why. It is essential to take the vision, formulate strategic tangible goals and find the strengths of those we are leading and plug them in to appropriate roles so THEY can run after the vision and lead others.

    Like

  12. i'm not a "metrics" kinda a gal. Actually, I don't even know what that word means. I'm def on the extreme, unbalanced side of having big vision, lofty ideas, and loose creativity. Thankfully, God's put me around strategic people who have kept me from jumping off some crazy vision cliff. :)Good word, Barbara

    Like

  13. Good word Barby!"BHAGs: big, hairy, audacious goals"BHAG'c connected to the vision that God gives carries the vision to potential. We see that at FRC with 50,100,150. The 50,100,150 is so visible and verbal that the whole team is able to "Share Responsibility for the Whole".

    Like

  14. Great review Barby …Thoughts – "Without my being consciously aware of it, Willow had evolved from a close-knit, single-identity, biblically functioning community into a decentralized, multi-identity, loosely connected federation of sub-ministries."This is why I find it important to keep the SAME vision in front of your staff and teams… Vision leaks – and if we're not careful … we can create competing "sub-ministerial" visions. (more reason to stay connected to the weekend services, the global staff meetings , celebration meetings , book studies like this … so the vision can be in front of us at all times.) 1) – Barby .. great question. I find it that having a well balanced team — with dreamers and visionaries on one end and strategic systematic managers on the other end can help some in creating those strategic plans. But yeah.. it is definitely a challenge .. a leader sees the big picture, sees it done , sees it fulfilled.. and there is danger in not strategizing how to get there.2) Attach vision to everything and everyone !! Always ! Always Always ….behind every number is a story , a name… the best way to push "metric" is to share the powerful stories of those people being transformed, families reconciled, broken hearts healed… HOWEVER … i would say this .. Numbers/Metrics matter – many times churches fail to set BHAGs because they think its not spiritual or its too cold and corporate… they then miss out on unleashing the power of the church and the potential to reach the masses ..Note – I love it that we can learn together via this online bookstudy … in chasing 50 campuses worldwide here at flamingo … I see a day when bloggers worldwide can be on the same page — literally — partnering with each other in reaching their God potential and keeping the vision fresh and alive in their hearts. Thanks for leveraging technology , collaborating and putting your thinking minds to work! The best is yet to come !

    Like

  15. I found the obviously painful process Willow went through, to turn vision into action, enlightening. Bill's challenge at the end – to become get-it-done leaders – also really spoke to me.Other thoughts:1)Do you ever find yourself pushing the "vision" as a leader, yet not teaching those you lead how to formulate strategic plans to achieve the vision?2)On the flip side, do you ever find you are pushing metrics, and neglecting to infuse vision in the hearts of those you lead?

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s